Responsible Gun Handling 101

Let me share a video with you that has been making it’s rounds on the net over the last few months:

As shooters, we are always saying that there is no such thing as an accidental discharge. That there is only a negligent discharge. This proves otherwise. The dude handled it very well I think. He followed all the rules for safe gun handling and yet it still went off. Thankfully he had his muzzle pointed in a safe direction when it went off.

And yet how many times do we hear about or even see someone who was not following the rules and something bad happened? More times then not, right? Being safe and being responsible is something we need to do all the time. That one time when we become lax and complacent is the time something bad will happen.

I listen to the Practically Tactical Podcast all the time and in some recent shows, they were talking about how there is no way to safely handle a deadly weapon. In reality, it’s responsibly handling a deadly weapon. I very much agree with that idea. If we think there is a safe way to handle a gun, we will become complacent. So the idea we always need to be responsible is key to being “safe”.

Being a responsible shooter includes knowing and living the Four Universal Rules of Gun Safety. Since it is early in a new year, I felt it was time to revisit these and make sure everyone knows them. They are:

  1. A gun is always loaded. Treat it as such.
  2. Never point a gun at something you are not willing to kill or destroy.
  3. Keep your finger out of the trigger until you are ready (and have made the decision) to shoot.
  4. Always know your target and what is beyond.

Following these rules is not just a suggestion. These are the rules that help to keep us safe and help to keep us responsible. Memorize them and always keep them in mind. Even if you just shoot once in a while, these rules will help to keep someone alive.

Shooting Drill: The 10-8 Pistol Standards #2

Photo: Greg Ellifritz

Choosing a shooting drill to run on and indoor static range can be difficult. Let me rephrase that. Choosing an effective drill for in indoor static range can be difficult. You can run all sorts of drills but finding something that teaches you something and also allows you track your performance is a whole different ball game.

That’s why when Greg Ellifritz talked about running this one, I was pretty excited. This is one that I have looked at before, but never really had the time to run. From what I have read both here and from the Modern Service Weapons site, this is a great drill, mainly because it incorporates a couple of other drills into it. If you have enough time and have a box of ammo, this is a great one box drill.

Check out Greg’s write up below by clicking the source link.

I got this drill from the Modern Service Weapons website. The 10-8 pistol standards #2 is a drill you can use to track your progress over time. There are no absolute standards. You only compete with yourself each subsequent time you shoot it. The drill is a tough one.

Source: Shooting Drill: The 10-8 Pistol Standards #2

Interesting Statistics on School Shootings

As you know, one of the blogs that I follow, almost religiously, is Greg Ellifritz’s Active Response Training blog. Recently he did a couple of articles on school shootings that made my head explode and I wanted to share them with you.

The first was When Do School Shootings Occur. In this article, Greg did a small study, looking at what times school shootings tended to happen during the day. Breaking down the stats he used to determine his findings, I was surprised to see that over the last three years there were only 7 shootings that occurred that fit the traditional definition of an “Active Shooter Incident”. I will be honest. That was a lot less then I thought. Granted, the media blows everything out of proportion, but still…only 7…I know. That is 7 more then there should be, but still.

I’m not going to go into too much detail since Greg does a way better job at breaking things down, and you need to read his article, but suffice to say, the amount of shootings outside school hours is way higher then you might imagine.

I am honestly surprised that more shootings DON’T occur outside school hours, like before or right after. When you think about it, it would be the perfect time to do it. Most schools will open their doors for early kids around 7:00 – 7:30. Some will serve breakfast for those kids since Mom and Dad have to work. They put most all grades together and there are not as many staff on hand as there would be normally. This would be the perfect time to commit a shooting. And that thought scares me. Especially since I have a little one who in a few years will be old enough to go to school.

So what’s the answer? It really is quite the conundrum. Well in true Greg fashion, he tackles that as well. In his next article Saved by the Bell: Strategies to Prevent Extra-Curricular School Shootings he tackles what he believes to be the answers.  Again, I will not go into too much detail, but the strategies and solutions he presents here are great and spot on.

Now if only schools would be willing to implement these changes.

New Hudson H9: First Impressions

Just in time for yet another SHOT SHOW, a newly designed pistol will be available for the show. Hudson MFG has announced the new H9 Pistol. This pistol has caught my eye for a couple of reasons.

Let me start with saying, I have not put hands on this pistol yet, these are just my impressions from seeing the promo videos and pictures online and reading about it from the manufacturers website. This is just gut feels at this point as this pistol is not in the wild right now. Which is a bummer.

The H9 is very interesting and caught my eye in that it looks very much like a redesigned 1911 in 9mm. It has a 1911 style grip and trigger, but they removed the hammer and replaced it with a striker firing mechanism. The other thing that has me intrigued is the lowered recoil spring. They lowered the spring on the frame and that makes me wonder how that makes the recoil feel. Does it help with recoil management? What does higher power 9mm and heavy rounds feel through it?

I am actually a little excited about this pistol. This could be a really well done redesign of the 1911. It could also be a flop, but either way, it has my curiosity piqued. I love my 1911’s and it seems like this could really be a fun pistol to shoot. I would love to get my hands on one and put it through it’s paces! Man this would be cool.

Below is the promo video from You Tube they released. Very well done and cool video. It’s definitely a well put together video. Enjoy the video and check out Hudson on the web, on instagram, Facebook and Twitter!

Widener’s Guide to Smokeless Powder

When getting into reloading, I remember how nervous I was trying to pick out my first powder. I did all the research online to see what most people were using for 9MM and what was available in my area. I read through all my manuals (I had 2 at the time) and compared and contrasted. Finally I settled on IMR 700 at the time. Now I am using Power Pistol.

There was a lot I didn’t understand, even back then. I had to do a lot of internet searches to try to break down how a powder works. I had to understand Burn Rate, different shapes and how they will meter through the powder measure. What I should expect to see and what was too much.

Smokeless Powder is the driving force behind our bullets and the most dangerous part of reloading. Too little and you can get a squib and not know it and blow up your gun. Too much and you will over charge the round and blow up your gun. Just right and the bullet will exit and go down range…..but you could still blow up your gun LOL! I am not trying to talk anyone out of reloading, just know that when dealing with the powder, it is an explosive and it can hurt you.

Our new friends over at Widener’s Reloading and Shooting Supply have come up with an excellent article/guide explaining how smokeless powder works. They go into how it works, what it looks like and they even have a video showing what is meant by Burn Rate and how it effects different powders. I wish I had known about this guide to use as a starting point back then.

Check out Wideners Guide to Smokeless Power and let us know what you think. This is a great beginners tool!